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Customs Entry Officers
Significant Points

This series includes all classes of positions the duties of which are to administer, supervise, or perform work involving the examination, acceptance, processing, or issuance of documents required for the entry of imported merchandise into the United States and the initial classification of merchandise covered by the entries; the final determination of the statutory classification of merchandise covered by the entries; the determination of customs duties and applicable internal revenue taxes accruing on such merchandise; the ascertainment of drawback to be paid on exported articles manufactured with the use of duty-paid or tax-paid imported merchandise or substituted domestic merchandise; and the determination of the validity of protests against liquidation decisions on formal entries.

Nature of the Work

The entry officer passes upon formal entries, with responsibility for estimating the amount of customs duties and applicable internal revenue taxes to be deposited and the amount of the bond to be furnished by the importer, pending final liquidation of the entry. The work performed by entry officers on individual formal entries is similar wherever performed. These duties have not been de scribed at each level in the standards, but are set forth as follows:

The entry officer:

(1) Determines that the party making entry has a right to do so, as evidenced by a properly executed bill of lading or an acceptable document in lieu thereof;

(2) Examines and compares entry forms, invoices, entry permits, bills of lading, and accompanying papers to insure that all required documents are present, complete, and prepared in accordance with requirements of laws and regulations; this involves examination of numerous items, including proper form of declaration, authorized signatures, and agreement of such pertinent details as invoice number, consignee, country of origin, date of export, carrier, quantities, package markings, merchandise description and values;

(3) Orders the posting of bonds for missing documents;

(4) Insures that an appropriate form of bond has been submitted in sufficient amount when required for the type of entry (in most positions, the entry officer also examines bonds for validity with respect to proper wording or format, principals and sureties, penalties, signatures, witnesses and other legal requirements);

(5) Examines the invoice and entry descriptions of merchandise, determines whether the tariff classifications as indicated on the entry form are correct in accordance with those descriptions, with any other information appearing on entry documents or invoices, and with provisions of the paragraphs of the Tariff Act and rates of duty therein or in Proclamations of the President pursuant to trade agreements or under the flexible tariff laws, (taking into consideration such factors as use, similitude, commercial or common designation, component materials, construction, and the relative specificity of competing tariff provisions,) and selects or verifies the appropriate rate where more than one may apply;

(6) Verifies the accuracy of the conversion of foreign currency to United States currency, insuring that the rate of exchange is properly applied as of the date of exportation of the merchandise;

(7) Verifies the accuracy of the conversion of foreign units of weight and measurement to units used as bases for assessment of rates of duty;

(8) Insures that any applicable internal revenue taxes assessable are included at correct rate;

(9) Verifies extensions and totals;

(10) Verifies commodity coding in accordance with the Statistical Classification of Imports of the Department of Commerce;

(11) Ascertains that each invoice covered by the entry shows the gross amount, deduction of nondutiable charges, deductions from invoice values to make entered values, and the addition of any dutiable charges not included in the gross amount, and of any other additions to make entered values (so that the final amount in the summary computation represents the aggregate of the entered values of all the merchandise on each invoice covered by the entry;

(12) Orders the weighing, gauging, counting, or measuring of merchandise where required;

(13) Designates for examination, by marks and numbers, specific packages (or, in certain instances, a percentage of total shipment), insuring that a proper sample is included, and indicates the place for examination.

In connection with the above basic functions, the entry officer must also determine that the entry meets a considerable number of requirements, which vary with such elements as type of entry, conditions of entry, country of origin of merchandise, or nature of merchandise. For example, the entry officer:

(1) Insures that a specific bonded warehouse has been designated on ware house entries and that a customs licensed cartman has been selected to do the required handling;
(2) Designates on entry documents the requirements for holding such merchandise as food, plant or animal products for inspection by other interested agencies of the Government; insures before acceptance of the entry, that items and commodities such as narcotics, gold, arms and munitions, foreign excess property, etc., meet conditions established by other agencies of the Government, including commodities subject to Foreign Assets Control;
(3) Estimates countervailing duties or other special duties;
(4) Accepts or refers to other employees in higher grade or to other parts of the collector's office entries covering particular categories of merchandise, such as items requiring special licenses, prohibited items, quota merchandise, or merchandise consigned to importers on "watch lists;"
(5) Examines for the presence, completeness, and proper execution of:

(a) Declarations or certificates required to establish as free of duty various categories of conditionally free merchandise;
(b) Documents accompanying immediate transportation entry forms for importations shipped in bond from other ports;
(c) Statements of component materials for certain commodities required in assessment of duties or taxes;
(d) Affidavits as to use of merchandise when rate of duty varies therewith;
(e) Certificates of origin when dutiable status or rate of duty is affected thereby;
(f) Special consular forms for restricted imports;
(g) Statements covering sale of merchandise in transit.

Because of the volume of entries and the requirement for taking action on the date of submission, the entry officer, particularly at larger ports, must exercise a high degree of skill to insure protection of the revenue and enforcement of the varied and numerous provisions of customs and related laws and regulations. They must, for example, be able to note immediately in the rapid review and comparison of documents any discrepancies or apparent evidence of fraudulent intent. If such intent is discovered, they report it to their supervisors for possible investigation by the Customs Agency Service. Items which must be so noted in the rapid review of entry documents are, for example, time gaps between export and entry dates, (which in periods of fluctuating currency may indicate the need for changes in entered statements of value), and such items as improperly described units of value, or unreasonable requests for changes in the ordering of packages for examination.

Because of the large volume of formal entry work at some ports in relation to the number of entry officers available to process such entries, certain of the less complex duties described above may not be performed by the entry officers, e.g., they may not verify accuracy of extensions or of the currency conversion rate, specific rate of duty, etc. However, they do make the more important determinations, such as proper tariff classification of the merchandise, right to make entry, presence of proper documentation and acceptability and sufficiency of bonds. The functions of the entry officers have a significant place in the over all customs procedures governing the importation of merchandise. All actions taken subsequent to entry concerning merchandise classification, total dutiable value and final amount of duties and taxes due can be expedited, if through the alertness and vigilance of the entry officer, the entry is proper in every respect with particular reference to the entered Tariff Act paragraph and rate of duty.

Proper entry precludes delays in moving merchandise, reduces the number of protests as to classification and minimizes the number of cases involving increases or refunds of duties.

Initial classification procedure

The initial classification of imported merchandise (as distinguished from advisory classification and statutory classification) is accomplished at the time the entry is presented. Determination of the initial classification of imported merchandise requires a general technical knowledge of grade, quality, construction, condition, and use of merchandise, together with the method of manufacture or production, as well as thorough knowledge of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, the Customs Simplification Acts pertinent trade agreements and treaties, and the legal application of present classification definitions.

In initially classifying merchandise, the customs entry officer:

(1) Scrutinizes the entry and determines that the papers present complete and proper documentation;
(2) Examines and analyzes the evidence submitted with the entries, invoices, affidavits, certificates, and other documents concerning the entered value, classification and description of the merchandise, including the kind, class, use, and quality, measure, weight or other characteristics;
(3) Selects the appropriate basis for initial classification by determining the use for which the merchandise is intended, its similitude to other merchandise (the classification of which is settled), and the characteristics of construction or component materials which place it within a specific provision of the proper paragraph of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended;
(4) Determines relative specificity of application of seemingly conflicting paragraphs of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended;
(5) Makes fine distinctions between paragraphs or portions of the same paragraph and, where necessary, selects the appropriate one of several rates in one provision.

On the basis of his determinations, the customs entry officer either accepts or rejects the entry. In the event of serious disagreement the matter is discussed with his supervisor.

Generally, the work of positions in the series is governed by the following guides:

(a) Tariff Act of 1930, as amended;
(b) Customs Simplification Acts of 1953, 1954, and 1956;
(c) Regulations issued under the Acts;
(d) Customs Manual;
(e) Customs Regulations and appendix thereto;
(f) Bureau rulings and office orders;
(g) Treasury decisions;
(h) Customs Court decisions;
(i) Applicable excise tax provisions of the Internal Revenue Code;
(j) Applicable regulations of other Government agencies, including Foreign Assets Control Manual for Customs Personnel and Regulations;
Department of State International Traffic in Arms Manual; National Firearms Act; Department of Commerce Foreign Excess Property Manual, etc.;
(k) Customs Information Exchange Circulars;
(l) Currency quotations of the Federal Reserve Board and the Secretary of the Treasury;
(m) Trade agreements;
(n) Listings of prohibited, restricted, quota, and other special categories of merchandise;
(o) Technical books and manuals;
(p) Encyclopedias;
(q) Foreign dictionaries.

Positions of entry officers require the use of all of these, to a greater or lesser extent and in addition,

(a) Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Statistical Classification of Commodities imported into the United States;
(b) Ordering manual;
(c) List of approved warehouses and cartmen;
(d) List of approved importer's premises and warehouses for outside examination by the appraiser.

All entry officers in the series (with the exception of those occupying trainee positions) have essentially the same nature, scope, and degree of authority and responsibility for decisions and conclusions. The difficulty and complexity of decisions involved in the exercise of this authority and responsibility, however, vary among the positions at different grade levels in relation to the technical determinations required by the nature and complexity of the entry and classification problems encountered. Generally, the entry officer's acceptance or rejection of entries and his determination as to the right to make entry are final for entry purposes, unless contested and appealed by an importer or broker. While there is complete review of entry documents in connection with the final assessment of duties and taxes in the liquidating process, the decisions of an entry officer are final in connection with the sufficiency of bonds posted, requirements for posting bonds for missing documents, authorization of release of merchandise on warehouse entries, and estimated duties and taxes deposited by an importer to secure release of merchandise on dutiable consumption entries. In addition, the entry officer's designation of specific packages of merchandise to be examined is final, although an appraising officer or inspector may request the submission of additional packages.

Customs Entry Officer, GS-1894-05

Duties

Work assignments at this level are designed to train the incumbents in the application of fundamentals of customs entry techniques; to orient employees in the policies, regulations, and practices of the Bureau; to facilitate the acquisition of a working knowledge of the guidelines and methods used; to familiarize employees with the various entry forms, invoices, affidavits, etc., and to facilitate evaluation of competency, potential, aptitude, and interests of the employee to provide a basis for more responsible assignments.

The work includes the following: works with an entry officer in higher grade and observes him in the processing of entries; examines entry forms, invoices, entry permits, and other forms; applies conversion tables of foreign weights and measures and verifies the conversion of foreign currency to United States currency as submitted on the assigned entry; searches for and assembles pertinent information from office files and records for use in assisting the entry officer of higher grade in making his decisions.

Nature of supervisory control exercised over the work:

Incumbents are under close technical and administrative control of an entry officer in higher grade who makes work assignments, furnishes detailed information, and gives specific instructions. In the early period of training, the work is closely reviewed for completeness, technical accuracy, adherence to sound entry and classification practices, and conformance to instructions. As the incumbent demonstrates increased competence, supervision becomes less intensive and review may be more often on a spot-check basis.

Nature of available guidelines:

Incumbents are engaged in becoming familiar with guidelines and applicable reference sources. Some judgment is applied in recognizing situations for which usual methods are not appropriate and for which reference to the supervisor is necessary.

Nature and purpose of personal work contacts:

Contacts with others are rare and usually limited to factual matters.

Nature and scope of conclusions and decisions:

There is no responsibility for independent conclusions and decisions at this level. Incumbent discusses all problems with his supervisor and is expected to be of practical assistance to him after an initial indoctrination period.

Qualifications statement:

Knowledge, abilities, and other qualities:
Ability to acquire a general knowledge of basic customs entry principles and classification techniques, laws, and procedures; aptitude for more difficult and responsible customs entry work; ability to analyze and condense material and adequately present it orally or in writing; personal traits such as alertness, cooperativeness, reliability, work accuracy, tact, resourcefulness, and judgment.

Customs Entry Officer, GS-1894-07

Duties

Entry Officers GS-7 receive training on assignments which typically represent a limited part or phase of broader assignments for which an entry officer in higher grade is responsible. Assignments are usually screened to determine that more difficult areas or unusual problems will not be encountered. Entry officers are required to be familiar with and to employ a number of individual standard entry and classification principles, techniques, and processes, so that they can carry out an assignment through a series of related detailed steps.

The following duties are typical but not all-inclusive: Working with or without an entry officer in higher grade present, examines assigned entry forms, in voices, affidavits, etc., and initially classifies the entered merchandise; estimates the correctness of the dutiable and non-dutiable charges as entered by the importer or his agent; assures that the importer or agent has the right to make entry; checks the conversion of foreign weights and measures to United States units and the conversion of foreign currency to United States currency at the prevailing rates of exchange, and on the basis of these actions recommends to his supervisor the acceptance or rejection of the entry as presented.

Nature of supervisory control exercised over the work:

Incumbent receives instruction from an entry officer in higher grade in the methods and techniques of determining initial classification and in customs entry procedures; and in applicable laws, regulations, and precedents. His completed work, including initial classification decisions and estimates of duties or applicable taxes, is carefully reviewed for accuracy, thoroughness, and correctness of conclusions. Responsibility for substantive decisions is assumed by the supervisor.

Nature of available guidelines:

The work is governed by the guides described under General Criteria in the Explanatory Statement. Such guides are supplemented by specific instructions from entry officers in higher grade concerning their application or interpretation.

Nature and purpose of personal work contacts:

Incumbent has limited contacts with importers, brokers, and with representatives of other Government agencies to request or furnish information and to explain customs requirements.

Nature and scope of conclusions and decisions:

Within the limitations of instructions and guidelines, the entry officer GS-7 applies some judgment and discretion to the solution of entry and classification problems. Although he does not make final decisions on acceptance or rejection of entries, his judgment in correctly interpreting the documents presented and in initially estimating the amount of duties and applicable taxes duty largely forms the basis for collection of the proper duties and taxes due.

Qualifications statement:
Knowledge, abilities, and other qualities:
Knowledge of the principal provisions of law, regulations, decisions, principles, policies, procedures, and practices which relate to initial classification of entries and the estimation of duties and applicable taxes due; familiarity with sources of information concerning other related provisions of law, regulations, decisions, principles, procedures, and practices; familiarity with overall customs clearance procedure; ability to assemble, analyze, and present oral or written information clearly; ability to observe and comprehend the significance of unusual conditions of documents indicating possible violations of laws and regulations; cooperativeness, judgment, tact, initiative, and reliability; and aptitude for more difficult and responsible customs entry and classification work.

Customs Entry Officer, GS-1894-08

Duties

Positions are located at ports or subports which, because of their geographical location, serve very limited industrial and commercial areas and receive very limited varieties of imports.

Basic duties of the Entry Officer GS-8 are described in Part I of the Explanatory Statement. The work of the incumbent is characterized by infrequent occurrence of entry or classification problems. There is substantially little or no variety in limited types of imports regularly received; e.g., only one or a very few commodities are regularly imported in commercial quantities.

Nature of supervisory control exercised over the work:

Incumbent works under the general supervision of a deputy collector in charge, or another entry officer in a higher grade, who makes an occasionally spot-check of the work.

Nature of available guidelines:

The work is governed by the basic guidelines described under General Criteria in the Explanatory Statement. Because of the very limited varieties of merchandise and the very limited number of sources from which it is received. There are relatively few problems of interpretation and application of guides.

Nature and purpose of personal work contacts:

The incumbent has contacts with importers, brokers, and others to request or furnish information and explain customs requirements. Work contacts are usually frequent, but ordinarily they are not as extensive or varied as those at higher levels, nor do they present difficult problems for the incumbent.

Nature and scope of conclusions and decisions:

The basic authority and responsibility of the Entry Officer GS-8 are described under General Criteria of the Explanatory Statement. At this level there is relatively few incidence of entry and classification problems and conclusions and decisions involve limited technical difficulty.

Qualifications statement:

The Entry Officer GS-8 must have the following knowledge, abilities, skills, and other qualities, in addition to those described for entry officers in the Explanatory Statement:

(1) Knowledge of the provisions of the Tariff Act, regulations and rulings under the Act, Treasury Decisions, decisions of the Customs Courts, applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, and pertinent regulations of other Government agencies, which are most frequently applied to the work and to the very limited varieties of merchandise typically involved;
(2) Familiarly with all other provisions of laws and regulations and with all other administrative and court decisions relating to the work, with particular application of these to the very limited variety of imports received;
(3) Ability to exercise independent judgment in solving problems of limited technical difficulty in the entry and classification of imports.

Customs Entry Officer, GS-1894-09

Duties

At this level two work situations exist:

Situation A:

Positions are located at ports which, because of their geographical location, serve limited industrial and/or commercial areas and receive limited varieties of imports.

Basic duties of GS-9 entry officer positions are described in Part I of the Explanatory Statement. At the GS-9 level (1) importations are received regularly from one or a few highly industrialized producing countries; (2) the countries from which the importations are received are not usually affected by continuing fluctuations in currency, multiple currencies, or involved changes in tax structures; (3) importations are received from a limited number of sources (manufacturers, producers, or sellers) within those countries; and (4) a limited variety of merchandise, items, grades, and qualities is dealt with. The work of the GS-9 entry officer position is characterized by relatively frequent occurrence of moderately complex problems requiring application of various entry and classification principles and techniques to new situations and the development of new technical knowledge.

However, by comparison with positions at the GS-10 level, the difficulty and complexity of entry officer positions GS-9 are not as great in that the problems encountered requiring application of various entry and classification principles and techniques are less complex and occur less frequently as compared with the GS-10 level.

Situation B:

Positions are located at ports which, because of their strategic geographical location, regularly receive a great variety of importations from many countries and from numerous sources (manufacturers, producers, and sellers) within those countries, and serve large industrial and commercial areas as import gateways.

The entry officer in this kind of position assists an entry officer in higher grade, in which capacity he (1) completes the entire entry process on assigned individual entries or on categories of entries which are assigned to him because no unusual problems or difficulties are anticipated; (2) works with the entry officer in higher grade on selected more difficult cases, completing either all or assigned portions of the entry process but receiving advice on problems that are new or complicated from the entry officer in higher grade who reviews the completed work and assumes responsibility for it; and/or (3) completes the entire entry process on all entries received over the counter but is expected to request advice and help from an entry officer in higher grade who reviews the work carefully and assumes responsibility for the more difficult entries.

While the incumbent in this type of position performs the same kind of duties as other entry officers in higher grades, his duties are less difficult and responsible since he receives more supervision and, consequently, does not have as great a degree of accountability for independent judgment or decision.

Nature of supervisory control exercised over the work:

Situation A: The entry officer works under an assistant collector, a deputy collector in charge, or another entry officer in higher grade, who makes an occasional spot check of the work.

Situation B: The entry officer continues to receive advice and instruction from his supervisor concerning applicable laws, regulations, and precedents. The work is reviewed closely to insure proper application of methods and techniques and correct interpretation of guides. As the Entry Officer GS-9 demonstrates increased competence, this review is lessened, although he is required to discuss new and unusual problems with his supervisor or with other entry officers in higher grade.

Nature of available guidelines:

In both situations A and B, the work is governed by the basic guidelines described under General Criteria in the Explanatory Statement.

In situation A, the entry officer must keep informed of frequent changes, recognize the need for research, and quickly locate applicable precedents, decisions, and orders. Judgment and resourcefulness are required in applying and interpreting various guides in the light of facts presented in such diverse problems as those concerned with legality of documents; acceptability of signatures; sufficiency of bonds; designation of packages to be examined; and classification of merchandise which involves questions of adequacy of the description of merchandise given and the correctness of the cited paragraph and rate, particularly when more than one Tariff Act paragraph seems applicable.

In situation B, however, the entry officer is required to confer more frequently with his supervisor concerning the interpretation and application of available guides.

Nature and purpose of personal work contacts:

In both situations A and B the incumbent has continual contacts with importers, and with brokers and other importers' representatives, to secure and furnish information and to explain customs requirements.

Nature and scope of conclusions and decisions:

In situation A, the basic authority and responsibility for conclusions and decisions are described under General Criteria in the Explanatory Statement. Judgment and resourcefulness are required in solving Problems in the initial classification of merchandise, and in searching for and applying statutes, regulations, orders, and precedents.

In situation B, the entry officer's acceptance or rejection of entries and his determination as to the right to make entry are for the most part accepted as final. However, because of the higher incidence of the more complex entry and classification problems, as compared with positions in situation A above, the entry officer in situation B is required to confer more frequently with the supervisor and his decisions are subject to closer review.

Qualifications statement:

The entry officer GS-9, situation A, must have the following knowledge, abilities, skills, and other qualities, in addition to those described for entry officers in the Explanatory Statement:

(1) Good knowledge of the provisions of the Tariff Act, regulations, rulings under the Act, Treasury Decisions, decisions of the Customs Courts, applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, and pertinent regulations of other Government agencies, which are most frequently applied to the work and to the limited varieties of merchandise typically involved;
(2) Knowledge of all other provisions of laws and regulations and of all other administrative and court decisions relating to the work with particular application of these to the limited varieties of imports received;
(3) Ability to exercise independent judgment in solving problems of moderate technical difficulty in the entry and classification of imports. The entry officer, GS-9, in situation B must have knowledge, abilities, skills and other qualities similar to those described for the GS-10 level, except that in situation B at GS-9 the incumbent applies these with less independence of action and decision.

Customs Entry Officer, GS-1894-10

Duties

Positions are located at ports which, because of their strategic geographical location, serve large industrial and/or commercial areas as import gateways, and receive a large variety of imports from many countries and from numerous sources.

Basic duties of positions of entry officer GS-10 are described in Part I of the Explanatory Statement. At the GS-10 level (1) importations are regularly received from at least several highly industrialized producing countries, (2) many of the countries from which importations are received have continuing fluctuations in currency, multiple currencies, or involved changes in tax structures, (3) importations are received from a large number of sources (manufacturers, producers, or sellers) within those countries, and (4) an extensive variety of merchandise, items, grades, and qualities is dealt with. The work is characterized by frequent occurrence of complex problems requiring extensive application of various entry and classification principles and techniques to new situations and the development of new technical knowledge.

However, by comparison with the GS-11 level, the difficulty and complexity of GS-10 positions are not as great as those described at the next higher level, in that the problems requiring application of various entry and classification principles and techniques are less complex and occur less frequently as compared with the GS-11 level.

Nature of supervisory control exercised over the work:

Entry officers GS-10 work under the general supervision of another entry officer who makes an occasional spot check of their work. The entry officers GS-10 discuss with their supervisors only the more difficult, complex, doubtful, or novel problems, or potentially precedent-setting interpretations. In addition, the supervisor provides advice on changes in regulations, statutes, procedures, and policies.

Nature of available guidelines:

The work of the entry officer GS-10 is governed by the basic guidelines described under General Criteria of the Explanatory Statement. Because of the proportionately lower incidence of entry and classification problems than at the GS-11 level, however, the application and interpretation of appropriate guides are less difficult and do not require as high a degree of knowledge, judgment, and resourcefulness.

Nature and purpose of personal work contacts:

The entry officer GS-10 deals directly with importers, brokers, and the importing public, advising on appropriate forms of entry, and explaining or interpreting legal and procedural requirements.

Nature and scope of conclusions and decisions:

The entry officer's authority and responsibility for conclusions and decisions are described under General Criteria of the Explanatory Statement. Because of the proportionately lower incidence of entry and classification problems than at the GS-11 level, technical decisions are relatively less difficult and are made with respect to relatively less varied types of commodities and smaller numbers of sources.

Qualifications statement:

The entry officer GS-10 must have the following knowledge, abilities, skills, and other qualities, in addition to those described for entry officers in the Explanatory Statement:

(1) Very good knowledge of the provisions of the Tariff Act, regulations and rulings under the Act, Treasury Decisions, decisions of the Customs Courts, applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, and pertinent regulations of other Government agencies, which are most frequently applied to the work and to the extensive varieties of merchandise typically involved;
(2) Good knowledge of all other provisions of laws and regulations and of all other administrative and court decisions relating to the work, with particular application of these to the extensive varieties of imports received;
(3) Ability to exercise independent judgment in solving difficult technical problems in the entry and classification of imports.

Customs Entry Officer, GS-1894-11

Duties

Positions are located at the headquarters port which (1) regularly receives the greatest variety and volume of importations from most of the exporting countries of the world, and from the great majority of sources (manufacturers, producers, and sellers) within those countries, and (2) serves as the import gateway for the entire nation.

Basic duties of positions of entry officer GS-11 are described in Part I of the Explanatory Statement. At the GS-11 level (1) importations are received regularly from practically all of the highly industrialized producing countries; (2) the great majority of the countries from which importations are received have continuing fluctuations in currency, multiple currencies, or involved changes in tax structures; (3) importations are received from a very large number of sources (manufacturers, producers, or sellers) within those countries; and (4) a very extensive variety of merchandise, items, goods, and qualities is dealt with. The work is characterized by the constant occurrence of highly complex entry and classification problems requiring extensive application of various entry principles to new situations and the development of new technical knowledge.

Nature of supervisory control exercised over the work:

Entry officers GS-11 work under the general supervision of another entry officer in higher grade. They discuss with their supervisors only the more difficult, novel, doubtful, or potentially precedent-setting interpretations. In addition, the supervisor provides advice on changes in regulations, statutes, procedures, and policies.

Nature of available guidelines:

The guidelines governing the work at this level are described under General Criteria in the Explanatory Statement. Because of the absence of responsibility for initially passing on special types of entries involving special requirements, rendering advisory services, authorizing special applications and permits, and resolving differences of opinion, the entry and classification problems at the GS-ll level do not require the same degree of knowledge, judgment, and resourcefulness in the application and interpretation of appropriate guides as that required at the GS-12 level.

Nature and purpose of personal work contacts:

Entry officers GS-11 deal directly with importers, brokers, and the importing public, accepting entries ''over the counter," advising as to the appropriate form of entry, discussing reasons for rejection, and explaining or interpreting legal and procedural requirements. In some instances, however, responsibility for dealing directly with the public may be vested in other positions in higher grade. In such a case the entry officer GS-11 participates in discussions when importers or brokers disagree with his decisions and present their cases to entry officers at higher levels.

Nature and scope of conclusions and decisions:

The entry officer's authority and responsibility for conclusions and decisions are described under General Criteria in the Explanatory Statement. By comparison with the GS-12 level, such conclusions and decisions are made with respect to entry and classification problems of lesser technical difficulty and do not involve responsibility for initial decisions on problems arising out of (a) advisory services, (b) the application of special requirements, (c) authorization of special applications and permits, and (d) resolution of differences of opinion.

Qualifications statement:

The entry officer GS-11 must have the following knowledge, abilities, skills, and other qualities, in addition to those described for entry officers in the Explanatory Statement:

(1) Thorough knowledge of the provisions of the Tariff Act, regulations and rulings under the Act, Treasury Decisions, decisions of the Customs Courts, applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, and pertinent regulations of other Government agencies, which are most frequently applied to the work and to the very extensive varieties of merchandise typically involved;
(2) Very good knowledge of all other provisions of laws and regulations and of all other administrative and court decisions relating to the work, with particular application of these to the very extensive varieties of imports received;
(3) Ability to exercise independent judgment in solving highly complex technical problems in the entry and classification of imports.

Customs Entry Officer, GS-1894-12

Duties

Positions are located at the headquarters port which (l) regularly receives the greatest variety and volume of importations from most of the exporting countries of the world and from the great majority of sources (manufacturers, producers, and sellers) within those countries, and (2) serves as the import gateway for the entire nation.

General details of the work performed by customs entry officers GS-12 are described in Part I of the Explanatory Statement. Entry officers GS-12 are particularly distinguished from those at the GS-11 level in that the incumbent of the GS-12 position serves as a principal point of contact between the entry division and importers, brokers, and the general public, with responsibility for (a) rendering advice and assistance on all types of entry problems and matters, (b) authorizing the use of various special types of entries, (c) approving various special applications and permits pertaining to entries of merchandise of exceptional variety and unusual complexity, and (d) insofar as possible, resolving differences of opinion between entry officers in lower grade and importers and brokers.

The entry officer GS-12 receives "over the counter" and authorizes the use of various types of entries which involve special requirements (detailed examination of these entries are subsequently made by other entry officers in lower grade). Included are appraisement entries, sample office entries, 12-month bond entries, narcotics, and articles for the use of the Federal Government or for the use of diplomatic officers of foreign governments. In authorizing such entries, the entry officer (a) questions importers or their agents to establish relevant facts pertaining, for example, to the nature of the merchandise, its condition on arrival, circumstances surrounding importation, residence status of importer (in connection with eligibility for free entry) or intent as to use of merchandise (in connection with merchandise claimed to be personal or household effects); (b) where-two or more alternatives are possible, gives advice as to the type of entry which will result in the most expeditious procedure for both the importer and the Government; 8 examines for presence and proper completion of necessary documents, including various affidavits, certificates, and declarations which are required in connection with conditionally free or other kinds of special entries; (d) determines, where applicable, the amount of bond to be posted; and (e) ascertains that all special requirements for the particular type of entry are met.

After similarly questioning the applicant and examining documents, the entry officer (a) approves permits for entry for merchandise over-carried to a second port, applications requesting outside examination of merchandise (after securing concurrence of the appraising officer involved), applications requesting permission for the importer to examine and sample merchandise at the public stores, and applications to substitute one type of entry for another; (b) issues duplicates for lost permits; and (c) certifies extracts of invoices to be used in connection with entry of partial shipments. When importers and brokers request clarification of or question the basis for return of entries for correction or rejection of entries, the entry officer GS-12 discusses with them the points involved; and as necessary, he confers with the entry officer in lower grade responsible for detailed processing of the entry, and supplies information or explanations requested, or renders decisions on points in dispute.

Nature of supervisory control exercised over the work:

Supervision exercised over the work is primarily administrative. The entry officer GS-12 is responsible for making independent decisions on technical matters. He discusses particularly novel or difficult problems with his supervisor. The work is reviewed primarily through evaluation of protests and complaints from importers and brokers. The entry officer informs his supervisor of problems which may involve policy or precedent-establishing decisions and, as an authority on entry matters, he usually recommends decisions on such cases based on his experience and on extensive research in guidelines and precedents.

Nature of available guidelines:

The guidelines governing the work of the entry officer GS-12 are described under General Criteria of the Explanatory Statement. Since the entry officer makes on-the-spot decisions, many of these guides, to a large extent, must be committed to memory and augmented by considerable experience in their application to unusual situations. Incumbents must keep informed of frequent changes, recognize the need for research, and be skillful in locating applicable precedents and decisions. Regulations governing certain forms of special entry or action are somewhat general, permitting discretionary determinations by the entry officer based on the facts in each case and consideration of over-all Custom procedure.

The exercise of judgment, resourcefulness, and originality is required in interpreting legal requirements, in establishing facts through skillful questioning, in determining the need for and devising affidavit forms, in helping importers and brokers to solve unusual problems, and in discerning evidence of fraudulent intent. Nature and purpose of personal work contacts:

The entry officer GS-12 deals constantly with importers, brokers, the importing public and representatives of other agencies of the Federal Government and those of foreign governments usually in matters concerning special types of entries. The varied situations encountered require adeptness in obtaining essential information and required documentation, and the exercise of tact and diplomacy in settling differences of opinion. The advice furnished by the entry officer is authoritative and includes, for example, the explanation of complex regulations, statutes, and procedures, and the interpretation of entry requirements on the basis of which the importer may decide not to import a particular type of merchandise.

Nature and scope of conclusions and decisions:

The basic authority and responsibility of the entry officer GS-12 for conclusions and decisions are described under General Criteria of the Explanatory Statement. Additional authority and responsibility exists at this level for rendering advice and assistance on all types of entry problems and matters, for approving the use of special types of entries, for approving various special application and permits on entries of merchandise of exceptional variety and unusual complexity, and for resolving differences of opinion between entry officers in lower grade and importers and brokers.

Qualifications statement:

The entry officer GS-12 must have the following knowledge, abilities, skills, and other qualities, in addition to those described for entry officers in the Explanatory Statement:

(1) Thorough and comprehensive knowledge of the provisions of the Tariff Act, regulations and rulings under the Act, Treasury Decisions, decisions of the Customs Courts, applicable provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, and pertinent regulations of other Government agencies, which are most frequently applied to the work and to the exceptional varieties of merchandise typically involved;
(2) Thorough knowledge of all other provisions of laws and regulations and of all other administrative and court decisions relating to the work, with particular application of these to the exceptional varieties of imports received;
(3) Ability to exercise independent judgment in solving unusually complex technical problems in the entry and classification of imports; in rendering advice and assistance on all types of entry problems and matters, in authorizing the use of special types of entries, in approving various special applications and permits on entries of merchandise of exceptional variety and unusual complexity and in resolving differences of opinion.

Individual Occupational Requirements

Background Security Investigation:If you have not already done so, you will need to successfully complete a background investigation before you can be appointed into this position.

Drug Testing: You must submit to a drug test and receive a negative drug test result before you can be appointed into this position.After appointment, you will be subject to random drug testing for illegal drug use.

Training: You will be required to attend 2 1/2 weeks of paid training at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia. This technical training must be successfully completed according to the standards of the agency. Failure to do so will be grounds for mandatory removal from the position. Such failure will result in either reassignment to a different position, demotion, or separation by appropriate procedures

Information on obtaining Customs Entry Officer positions with the Federal Government is available from the Office of Personnel Management through USAJOBS, the Federal Government's official employment information system. This resource for locating and applying for job opportunities can be accessed through the Internet at http://www.usajobs.gov or through an interactive voice response telephone system at (703) 724–1850 or  (703) 724–1850  or TDD (978) 461–8404 and   (978) 461–8404. These numbers are not toll free, and charges may result. For advice on how to find and apply for Federal jobs, download the Insider's Guide to the Federal Hiring Process” online here.

Source: OPM's Position Classification Standards for White Collar Work


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