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Aviation Safety Inspectors
Significant Points

This series includes positions that involve primarily developing, administering, or enforcing regulations and standards concerning civil aviation safety, including (1) the airworthiness of aircraft and aircraft systems; (2) the competence of pilots, mechanics, and other airmen; and (3) safety aspects of aviation facilities, equipment, and procedures. These positions require knowledge and skill in the operation, maintenance, or manufacture of aircraft and aircraft systems.

Nature of the Work

Aviation safety inspectors apply a broad knowledge of the aviation industry, the general principles of aviation safety, and the Federal laws, regulations, and policies affecting aviation. In addition, they apply intensive technical knowledge and skill in the operation, maintenance, or manufacture of aircraft.

Aviation safety inspectors develop, administer, and enforce the regulations and standards relating to aviation safety. They provide advice and guidance to many segments of the aviation industry and airmen in the interest of aviation safety. They perform the following types of duties:

  • Examining and issuing certificates to pilots and other airmen.
  • Evaluating and approving training methods, facilities, and equipment for pilots, mechanics, and other aviation personnel.
  • Issuing certificates and inspecting and evaluating activities of aviation organizations, such as air carriers, air taxis, and repair stations for conformance with the terms of their certification.
  • Monitoring the activities of aviation organizations including changes in their equipment, facilities, organization, key personnel, and overall scope of operations.
  • Monitoring, inspecting, and investigating civil aviation activities in their geographic areas to ensure compliance with Federal regulations and safety requirements, instituting appropriate enforcement action as necessary. Inspectors have authority to decide whether legal or administrative action is requirements and their decisions are final.
  • Participating in accident investigations from the standpoint of Federal regulatory authority.
  • Advising persons desiring to enter some segment of the aviation industry on regulatory requirements, and on the facilities, equipment, personnel, and organization needed to operate safely.
  • Inspecting the airworthiness of aircraft, particularly those which have undergone alteration or major repair.
  • Inspecting plants that manufacture aircraft and aircraft parts to determine whether equipment, facilities, personnel, methodology, and quality control systems are adequate to produce the part or aircraft in conformance with the design specifications.
  • Conducting seminars and advising pilots, mechanics, and the general aviation public on aviation safety and accident prevention.
  • Aviation Safety Inspector, GS-1825-05

    Duties

    This is a training level assignment which involves the performance of a variety of standardized tasks that are selected to provide: (1) Training and on-the-job experience in aviation safety methods, procedures, and techniques; (2) an orientation to relevant programs, policies, and procedures; and (3) a basis for more responsible assignments.

    Level of responsibility

    GS-5 employees work under close supervision of higher grade employees who provide detailed instructions on the use of selected specific methods, procedures, and techniques, and who outline the objectives of each assignment. Work in progress and results are closely checked for accuracy and to evaluate the trainee's rate of development.

    Aviation Safety Inspector, GS-1825-07

    Nature of work assignments

    This is usually a developmental level assignment. Aviation Safety Inspectors GS-7 typically perform assigned tasks as an assistant to an employee of higher grade. GS-7 employees perform a wider range of assignments than is typical at grade GS-5, and apply judgment based on knowledge of established practice in planning their work, in selecting from available methods and techniques, and in preparing factual reports.

    The following assignments are illustrative:

    1. Conducting airmen flight tests for private pilot certificates in light single engine aircraft and making reports and recommendations on pilot competence to the assigned inspector.
    2. Reviewing applicant qualifications for private pilot examinations.
    3. Collecting data on aviation activities from log books, and from inspecting aircraft, equipment, and maintenance records.
    4. Responding to inquiries from the general public, private pilots, aviation mechanics, etc., regarding aviation safety regulations, procedures, and requirements for certification, etc.

    An aviation safety inspector of higher grade describes the purpose, scope, and critical points and anticipated results of each assignment and reviews the results produced. In contrast to the GS-5 level where practically all work is closely checked, routine assignments are spot checked for compliance with instructions.

    Assignments involving new or unfamiliar methods, procedures, or products are reviewed closely for adherence to instructions and accuracy and reasonableness of the results produced. Advice and assistance in resolving unusual or unanticipated problems as they occur are available.

    Aviation Safety Inspector, GS-1825-09

    Nature of work assignments

    Aviation Safety Inspectors GS-9 apply knowledge of (1) the operation or maintenance of small single- engine piston aircraft and (2) appropriate laws, regulations, safety standards, inspection procedures, and examining methods to carry out their assignments. Assignments involve inspecting specific facilities, equipment, and aircraft for regulatory compliance and performing limited phases of broader assignments that are the responsibility of higher level employees.

    The following assignments are illustrative:

    1. Conducting commercial pilot flight tests in small single-engine aircraft.
    2. Investigating requests for waivers for general aviation operations, gathering information, making recommendations, and conducting periodic surveillance for continued compliance with waiver conditions.
    3. Conducting periodic flight proficiency checks of flight instructors, determining pilot competency, and making recommendations to as signed inspectors.
    4. Inspecting repairs and alterations made on small single-engine aircraft.

    Level of responsibility

    Supervisory guidance varies depending upon the familiarity and experience of GS-9 employees in the area of assignment. They receive little or no instruction on assignments involving familiar aircraft, facilities, and equipment. Where these factors are new, GS-9 employees receive closer guidance and are frequently accompanied by experienced employees on their initial assignments in the area, GS-9 employees are expected to recognize and report unanticipated or unusual problems and safety hazards. More experienced employees are available for follow-up when needed.

    Regulations and safety standards are clear and specific. Established inspection procedures and testing methods are directly appropriate.

    GS-9 employees issue temporary certificates to individual airmen, but their recommendations and findings are normally reviewed by a higher-level employee for accuracy and established guidelines, before being acted upon.

    Contacts at GS-9 are with individual pilots and mechanics in the course of conducting examinations and inspections.

    Aviation Safety Inspector, GS-1825-11

    Nature of work assignments

    Aviation Safety Inspectors GS-11 apply knowledge of (1) the flight operations or maintenance of a broad range of light single- and twin-engine aircraft engaged in private aviation activities and (2) the laws, regulations, and safety standards pertaining to limited areas of commercial and industrial operations.

    GS-11 assignments typically involve making routine inspections of organizations (e.g., air carriers, air taxis executive operators, flight and ground schools, mechanic schools, and repair stations) for compliance with their approved programs and procedures, Federal aviation regulations, and good safety practices. (By comparison, GS-9 employees inspect and rate individual airmen and aircraft rather than aviation organizations.)

    GS-11 employees examine and evaluate (I) individual pilots by written and oral examinations and flight tests or (2) mechanics by written and practical examinations. The following assignments are illustrative:

    1. Inspecting the performance and activities of authorized mechanics, repairmen, inspectors, and designated examiners for the quality of their work and compliance with Federal aviation regulations.
    2. Evaluating the performance of flight instructors and designated pilot examiners who instruct and examine candidates for private and commercial pilot certificates.
    3. Inspecting single- and twin-engine piston aircraft for airworthiness after major repairs or alterations.
    4. Inspecting repair stations and other maintenance facilities to ensure that equipment, mechanics, and services are in compliance with their approved programs.
    5. Conducting spot and ramp inspections, airport inspections, and en route station inspections for safety problems and adequacy of facilities.

    Level of responsibility

    GS-11 employees independently conduct most routine assignments. They receive instructions on the objectives of assignments and any unusual problems or situations involved. (By comparison, GS-9 employees have sufficient experience to work independently in a narrow area but receive more guidance with assignments in new areas.) Supervisors are available to advise GS-11 employees if they encounter technical or regulatory problems.

    GS-11 employees apply regulations and safety standards that are well established and fully applicable. Inspection procedures and testing methods may require minor adaptation to fit the individual situation. (By comparison, GS-9 employees seek supervisory assistance if established procedures and methods are not directly applicable.)

    GS-11 employees have authority to issue temporary certificates to private pilots, commercial pilots, flight instructors, and mechanics, Based on the temporary certification, the permanent certificates are issued at a later date. (By comparison, the authority of GS-9 employees to issue temporary certificates is closely controlled and is subject to spot check review.) At GS-11, decisions are limited to individual airmen.

    Contacts at GS-11 are with individual pilots or mechanics in the course of conducting examinations and inspections and with employees and managers in the organizations undergoing inspection.

    Aviation Safety Inspector, GS-1825-12

    Nature of work assignments

    Aviation Safety Inspectors GS-12 apply knowledge of (1) the flight operation of multiengine (two or more) piston, or twin-engine turboprop aircraft and (2) the laws, regulations, and safety standards pertaining to the operation and airworthiness of aircraft engaged in carrier, commercial, executive, or agricultural operations. (By comparison, GS-11 employees primarily apply knowledge of light piston-powered aircraft used primarily for pleasure or personal transportation.)

    Some GS-12 inspectors perform duties concerned with the inspection and surveillance of complex aviation organizations where certificate responsibility is vested in a higher graded inspector.

    Such assignments typically involve (1) evaluating air carrier or flight school training programs and conducting flight examinations for airmen who fly large piston-engine or twin turboprop aircraft and (2) analyzing and monitoring broad program elements of flight or maintenance activities of complex aviation organizations and evaluating program change proposals. (By comparison, GS-11 employees conduct routine fact-finding inspections which require little in the way of program analysis.)

    Other GS-12 employees (1) inspect and issue airworthiness certificates to multiengine piston or turboprop aircraft or (2) examine, certificate, and monitor flight schools, repair stations, mechanic or repairman schools, air taxis, executive fleets, and other aviation organizations which fall in the lower range of scope and complexity. (By comparison, GS-11 employees normally certify only individuals and are not called upon to issue certificates to organizations.)

    The following assignments are illustrative:

    1. Inspecting an air carrier maintenance sub-base and determining if it is adequately staffed and equipped to perform work in compliance with terms of certification; or inspecting carrier flight training programs and evaluating curriculum and administration to determine whether airmen training meets criteria in operations specifications and approved manuals.
    2. Evaluating and issuing certificates to repair stations and other maintenance facilities that primarily repair avionics or other parts of the aircraft, such as radios or accessories. Continually monitoring the activities of stations or facilities to ensure that they comply with their approved program, or approving changes in the program as necessary.
    3. Inspecting and approving airworthiness of multi-engine piston aircraft, which have undergone major overhaul, alterations, or repairs, ensuring compliance with Federal aviation regulations, airworthiness directives, technical orders and bulletins, manufacturers' specifications, and the air carriers' manuals.
    4. Issuing and monitoring certificates for small air carriers, air taxis, and commercial operations characterized by:

    (1) Limited number of one or two types of small piston-powered aircraft;
    (2) Availability of good, reliable maintenance;
    (3) Operations within a limited geographic environment for which standard navigation and landing techniques are adequate; and
    (4) Stability of the size and nature of the operation and types of aircraft employed, and financial soundness.

    5. Investigating commercial pilots accused of not following regulations and standards for safe operation or maintenance of their aircraft.
    6. Evaluating the instruction, administration, organization, or curriculum of a flight, ground, or mechanic school that wants to make changes in its curricula, equipment, or facilities that must be approved for the school to keep its certificate.
    7. Investigating repair stations for which complaints have been received about the quality of their work.
    8. Inspecting aviation operations for compliance with regulatory requirements, limitations, and conditions imposed in grants of waivers for experimental aircraft, air shows, and similar special operations.

    Level of responsibility

    GS- 12 employees independently plan and conduct a wide range of assignments including those that involve violations and safety problems. They receive instruction in terms of the objectives of assignments and are expected to deal with problem and unusual situations on their own. (By comparison, GS-11 employees have supervisory guidance in dealing with problems.)

    Regulations and safety standards are broad and general. They frequently do not deal directly with the specific issues at hand. GS-12 employees must interpret the regulations and apply their knowledge of precedent cases and good safety practices to carry out their assignments. (By comparison, at GS-11, established regulations and safety standards are fully applicable.)

    The decisions of GS-12 employees to issue certificates and approve proposals that modify the authority of aviation organizations, and their recommendations resulting from inspections and investigations are the bases for actions taken by the district office. Their decisions have substantial impact on the activities of aviation organizations for which they have certification responsibility. (By comparison, at GS-11 the impact of decisions is limited to individual airmen and mechanics.)

    At GS-12, contacts are with managers of aviation organizations, e.g., schools, repair stations, air carriers, primarily to advise them on regulatory requirements, make initial certification, evaluate proposals to modify certificates and resolve regulatory and safety problems. GS-12 employees exercise considerable tact and judgment to deal with persons under sensitive conditions and to obtain voluntary compliance with safety practices that are not absolute regulatory requirements. (By comparison, GS-11 employees have contacts with individual pilots and mechanics in the course of conducting inspections and examinations.)

    Aviation Safety Inspector, GS-1825-13

    Nature of work assignments

    GS-13 assignments are characterized by one or more of the following:

  • Multiengine turboprop or turbojet aircraft or the complex avionics equipment associated with such aircraft;
  • A variety of flight or maintenance operations with diverse types of aircraft which may include turbine powered aircraft; or
  • Novel and complex aviation operations.
  • Many Aviation Safety Inspectors GS-13 issue certificates to and monitor (1) a large and complex aviation organization or (2) a number of smaller organizations that, together, are comparable in complexity to one large one. They are the primary contact point with the aviation organization(s). They may decide on issuance of the original certificates. They receive all work assignments and information pertaining to the organizations for which they are responsible. They evaluate and decide upon proposals to change the authorized programs of the organizations. They continuously monitor the activities of organizations to determine whether they are following their authorized program, Federal regulations, and good safety practices. (By comparison GS-12 employees issue certificates to small and uncomplicated organizations.)

    Other GS-13 employees participate extensively in the certification inspection, and surveillance of highly complex air carrier operations where principal program responsibility is vested in an aviation safety inspector of higher grade. These GS-13 employees have broad authority to negotiate with carrier management and make technical determinations within the coverage of approved specifications and policy manuals. (By comparison, GS-12 employees deal with highly complex aviation organizations on narrower, more specific assignments.)

    Some GS-13 employees also carry out assignments that primarily require knowledge of flight operation of a particular type of four- engine turboprop aircraft or large turbojet aircraft. These assignments typically include analyzing pilot training, and giving flight tests and proficiency checks to pilots and other airmen and evaluating schools that train airmen to operate the particular type of aircraft. (By comparison, similar assignments at the GS-12 level involve smaller turboprop or large piston-engine aircraft.)

    The following assignments are illustrative:

    1. Exercising certificate authority for flight operations or maintenance over one or more air carriers, contract operators, and air travel clubs that collectively employ a fleet of large aircraft powered by turbine or piston engines. The assigned carriers conduct domestic or international flights on a scheduled or nonscheduled basis. Approving the airworthiness of the aircraft; the adequacy of the maintenance program; training programs for mechanics, repairmen, pilots, and other flight personnel; the nature and scope of the operation (e.g., the kind of cargo, passenger, and geographic area covered); adequacy of maintenance facilities and airports; and the overall adequacy of the organization in terms of safety. Monitoring, planning (and in some cases personally conducting) inspection programs including periodic en route and ramp inspections. Receiving information about and following up on any changes in the approved program (e.g., change in route, new or modified aircraft, new or modified maintenance programs or facilities). Receiving and following up complaints about those organization(s) for which they are responsible.

    2. Serving as the principal contact with, and having responsibility for the certification, inspection, and surveillance of the flight operations of a group of aviation organizations. Receiving all work assignments and information pertaining to the organizations and establishing work programs which will assure adherence of organizations to manuals and regulations. Continuously monitoring activities of organizations to determine whether they are following authorized programs; and evaluating proposals to change programs. The organizations collectively employ a variety of makes and models of aircraft. They include flying schools that employ full-time instructors and are rated for commercial and instrument flight instruction, and air taxis holding instrument authorizations or serving cities also served by two or more scheduled air carriers.

    3. Serving as the principal contact with, and having responsibility for certification, inspection, and surveillance of a group of aviation organizations, including repair stations which collectively perform overhaul of airframes and powerplants and accessories; the equipment overhauled includes multiengined airframes and a variety of makes and models of airframes and powerplants. Evaluating and approving or disapproving applications by maintenance facilities for approved repair station certificates and ratings; deciding whether facilities, equipment, materials, personnel, inspections methods and maintenance practices and techniques are satisfactory to as sure airworthiness of aircraft; and approving manuals or requiring amendment thereto.

    4. Evaluating broad program elements of flight operations or maintenance activities of a major air carrier and deciding upon modifications or additions to operating procedures and policy guides. Recommending approval or disapproval of certificate amendments and substantial changes in operating specifications to a senior aviation safety inspector who is the principal representative for the carrier. Planning and conducting inspections and surveillance of assigned areas of carrier operations to as sure compliance with Federal aviation regulations. Negotiating with carrier officials on violations, deficiencies, and other action items.

    5. Conducting initial certification and periodic flight checks of airmen operating large multiengined aircraft using advanced instrument flight techniques. Evaluating and in some cases issuing certificates to flight and ground schools that give training in the operation of that type of aircraft.

    6. Issuing waivers for experimental aircraft, air shows, or other unusual aviation operations (e.g., approving external load helicopter operations in congested urban areas). Making initial determinations of limitations and conditions.

    7. Issuing certificates to and monitoring one or more air taxi and/ or executive operations that characteristically involve some factors of special difficulty such as the following: (1) Operation over a large territory (several States or major cities), perhaps with international flights; (2) scheduled passenger separations; (3) diverse types of aircraft including turbine powered or large piston-engine models; and (4) unpredictable variations from month to month regarding the scope of operations, personnel, and aircraft involved. Giving extensive technical and regulatory guidance to persons desiring to enter the aviation business and advice and assistance to operators in dealing with their day-to-day problems.

    Level of responsibility

    GS-13 employees plan and conduct their assignments with substantial technical independence. They receive administrative and policy guidance from their supervisors and policy makers. They also obtain technical advice from higher level inspectors who are experts on a particular type of aircraft or who have overall program responsibility. They independently plan and carry out a work program to meet the needs and monitor the activities of the organizations for which they have certification responsibility. The scope and complexity of the work program may be such as to require the occasional assistance of other employees to conduct inspections and evaluate operations.

    Guidelines and precedents are frequently inadequate for dealing with novel or complex operations. GS-13 employees understand and apply the basic principles of aviation safety and interpret the intent of the regulations. (By comparison, at GS-12, precedent cases are usually available.)

    By comparison to GS-12, the broader scope of activities and larger size of organizations assigned to GS-13 employees result in decisions affecting the safety of larger numbers of people and having greater impact on the aviation industry.

    At GS-13 contacts are frequently with owners and top managers of aviation corporations and involve negotiating and resolving the full range of issues and problems that confront large aviation organizations. Occasionally is sues are controversial, arousing considerable public interest. (By comparison, at GS-12, employees rarely get involved in public issues.)

    Aviation Safety Inspector, GS-1825-14

    Nature of work assignments

    Some GS-14 assignments involve region wide responsibility for application of expert knowledge of flight operations for an advanced multiengined turbojet aircraft. Such employees are concerned with all aspects of the operational capabilities and limitations of the aircraft. Other GS-14 inspectors establish technical procedures and performance yardsticks and review complete flight operation or maintenance programs for major air carriers who are leaders in the aviation industry, or who have problems of comparable scope and complexity, or a uniquely complex group of general aviation organizations. Assignments at this level are of great scope and unusual complexity and the organizations monitored are major factors in the industry.

    The following assignments are illustrative:

    1. As a regional expert on a particular type of sophisticated multiengined turbojet aircraft:

  • Advises other inspectors of major changes in the operation of the aircraft;
  • Standardizes procedures and judgments used by inspectors to evaluate the operation of the aircraft;
  • Evaluates new training methods and equipment (e.g., simulators) for initial certification;
  • Serves on national boards that determine the minimum equipment necessary to operate a particular type of aircraft safely; and
  • Serves on boards that evaluate incidents, accidents, complaints, and other serious problems relating to the aircraft. Develops plans to resolve problems.
  • 2. As the principal representative in regulatory surveillance of air carrier activities, exercises certificate authority over a major air carrier with very extensive and complex operations. Analyzes flight operations involving large fleets of turbojet aircraft engaged in large-scale passenger and freight service; or evaluates maintenance activities and complete aircraft overhaul facilities which are equipped and staffed to handle the latest and most sophisticated turbojet aircraft and associated systems. This level includes responsibility for nationally and internationally prominent carriers who operate the largest, most advanced fleets of turbojet aircraft in the industry. (By comparison, GS-13 employees exercise certificate authority over less complex air carriers or perform major portions of the certification, inspection, and surveillance for major carriers under the direction of GS-14 inspectors.)

    3. Exercises certificate authority and safety responsibility over a complex of broad and varied general aviation organizations such as air taxis, executive and/or industrial operators, repair stations, and flight and mechanic schools when the activities monitored equate collectively to a major air carrier in terms of size and complexity of aircraft fleet employed, scope and technical complexity of operations, management sophistication, industry leadership, and public impact. The magnitude, intensity, and scope of program responsibility are typically such as to require significant and regular assistance of lower graded inspectors.

    Level of responsibility

    GS-14 employees develop and evaluate flight operations or maintenance programs for organizations which utilize the newest, most complex aircraft, systems, and equipment. Because of organizational complexity or the advanced technology incorporated in the aircraft, systems, and equipment, employees must exercise originality to resolve unique problems. They frequently rely on engineers and designers for specific technical guidance although much of their work is carried out under very broad policy guidelines. Supervisors give GS-14 employees a wide leeway for independent action. Other inspectors seek their advice on problems relating to aircraft and their operation and maintenance. Because of the precedent-setting nature or substantial effect on the aviation industry or public safety, their decisions may be reviewed and approved at a higher policy- setting level.

    Decisions typically have broad impact on the operation or maintenance of a particular type of advanced aircraft, major air carriers, or a geographic area containing a variety of novel and/or complex aviation operations. Decisions also have a significant effect on the safety of the flying public.

    In addition to those contacts described at GS-13, GS-14 employees have critically important and frequently controversial contacts with key officials of major manufacturers, major carriers, and general aviation organizations. Contacts are made to resolve issues which affect the initial certification and major modifications of aircraft, maintenance or operations programs, and their effect on safety and compliance with regulations.

    Individual Occupational Requirements

    General Requirements for All Positions:

  • Not more than two separate incidents involving Federal aviation regulations violations in the last 5 years;
  • Valid State driver‘s license;
  • Fluency in the English language;
  • No chemical dependencies or drug abuse that could interfere with job performance; and
  • High school diploma or equivalent.
  • Medical Requirements for All Positions:

    Applicants must be physically able to perform the duties of the Aviation Safety Inspector position in a safe and efficient manner, and must meet all of the following requirements:

  • Have good distant vision in each eye and be able to read printed materials the size of typewritten characters (glasses and contact lenses permitted) without strain;
  • Have the ability to hear the conversational voice (hearing aid permitted);
  • Not have any physical condition that would cause them to be a hazard to themselves or others or that would interfere with their ability to fly as passengers in a variety of aircraft.
  • In addition, applicants for positions that require participation in the operation of aircraft must:

  • Possess a valid second–class medical certificate in accordance with Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) regulations; and
  • Pass recurrent medical examinations as prescribed by the FAA.
  • Specialized Experience Requirement for All Positions:

    One year of specialized experience equivalent to at least the next lower grade level in the normal line of progression is required.   More than one year of specialized experience may be required for specific positions.   Accordingly, the specialized experience provision in paragraph E.3 (m) of  “General Policies and Instructions” does not apply to these positions.

    SPECIALIZED EXPERIENCE, TRAINING, AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIFIC POSITIONS

    Applicants must meet the specific requirements described below for the following types of Aviation Safety Inspector positions:

    Aviation Safety Inspectors (Operations)

    When the predominant work involves air carrier operations, applicants for Aviation Safety Inspector (Operations) positions must meet all of the following requirements.

  • At least 1 year of pilot experience in multi–engine aircraft of more than 12,500 pounds maximum certificated takeoff weight;
  • Not more than 2 flying accidents during the last 5 years in which the applicant‘s pilot error was involved;
  • Professional flying skill as demonstrated in a simulator check to Airline Transport Pilot Standard.
  • Minimum 100 flight hours during the last 3 years;
  • Airline Transport Pilot Certificate or Commercial Pilot Certificate with instrument airplane rating (Department of Navy positions require pilot experience as demonstrated by previous ATP level performance in large multi–engine airplanes and helicopters);
  • Possession of a valid second–class FAA medical certificate (For positions within the Department of Navy, applicants must also be physically qualified to ride as an observer aboard squadron aircraft.   In addition, must also meet physical requirements to travel and lift heavy objects while performing mishap investigations); and
  • Minimum 1,500 total flight hours.
  • When the predominant work involves general aviation operations, applicants for Aviation Safety Inspector (Operations) positions must meet all of the following requirements.

  • Valid, unexpired Flight Instructor Certificate with single and multi–engine airplane and instrument airplane ratings.   Must have given a minimum of 200 hours of flight instruction in an aircraft.
  • Professional flying skill as demonstrated in a flight check to Commercial Pilot Certificate with an instrument rating;
  • Possession of Airline Transport Pilot Certificate or Commercial Pilot Certificate with instrument airplane rating.
  • Minimum of 100 flight hours within the last 3 years.
  • Minimum of 1,500 total flight hours.
  • Possession of single and multi-engine land airplane ratings.
  • Not more than 2 flying accidents in the last 5 years in which the applicant‘s pilot error was involved.
  • Possession of a valid second–class FAA medical certificate.
  • Aviation Safety Inspector (Airworthiness)

    When the predominant work involves air carrier avionics, applicants for Aviation Safety Inspector (Airworthiness) positions must meet all of the following requirements.

  • Aircraft avionics experience involving the maintenance, repair, and troubleshooting of installed avionics systems on aircraft.
  • Avionics maintenance experience on aircraft of more than 12,500 pounds maximum certificated takeoff weight.
  • Aircraft avionics work experience (which could include supervision or auditing) in a repair station; air carrier repair facility; military repair facility; or local, state, or Federal governmental agency within the last 3 years.
  • When the predominant work involves general aviation avionics, applicants for Aviation Safety Inspector (Airworthiness) positions must meet all of the following requirements.

  • Aircraft avionics experience involving the maintenance, repair, and troubleshooting of installed avionics systems on aircraft.
  • Aircraft avionics work experience (which could include supervision or auditing) in a repair station; air carrier repair facility; military repair facility; or local, state, or Federal governmental agency within the last 3 years.
  • When the predominant work involves air carrier maintenance, applicants for Aviation Safety Inspector (Airworthiness) positions must meet all of the following requirements.

  • Experience involving the maintenance and repair of airframes, power plants, and systems of multi–engine aircraft of more than 12,500 pounds maximum certificated takeoff weight maintained under an airworthiness maintenance and inspection program.
  • Aircraft maintenance experience in a repair station; air carrier or airline repair facility; military repair facility; or local, state, or Federal governmental agency.
  • Experience involving the maintenance and repair of airframes, power plants, and aircraft systems with responsibility for certifying airworthiness.
  • Aircraft maintenance work experience within the last 3 years.
  • FAA Mechanic Certificate with airframe and power plant ratings.
  • When the predominant work involves general aviation maintenance, applicants for Aviation Safety Inspector (Airworthiness) positions must meet all of the following requirements.

  • Experience involving the maintenance and repair of airframes, power plants, and aircraft systems with responsibility for certifying airworthiness.
  • Maintenance experience with aircraft 12,500 pounds or less maximum certificated takeoff weight.
  • Aircraft maintenance experience in a repair station; air carrier or airline repair facility; military repair facility; or local, state or Federal governmental agency.
  • Aircraft maintenance work experience within the last 3 years.
  • FAA Mechanic Certificate with airframe and power plant ratings.
  • Aviation Safety Inspector (Manufacturing)

    When the predominant work involves manufacturing, applicants for Aviation Safety Inspector (Manufacturing) positions must meet one of the following requirements.

  • Experience in the area of quality systems, methods, and techniques in the manufacture of products and/or articles that demonstrates the ability to determine whether aircraft and related products meet the approved design criteria, or the design criteria on which approval is being sought and is in condition for safe operations; or
  • Experience involving either the actual issuance of airworthiness certificates or having responsibility for managing programs leading to the issuance of original airworthiness certificates or original export airworthiness approvals for products and/or articles; or
  • Experience involving a combination of paragraph A and paragraph B above.
  • Acceptable specialized experience for paragraph A includes actual experience in a majority of the following areas:

  • First article, in process and final assembly inspection;
  • Quality assurance provisions of special processes (e.g. heat treating, brazing, welding, carburizing, plating, CAD-CAM, robotics, software quality control, etc.,)
  • Destructive and non-destructive inspection;
  • Manufacturing processes;
  • Airworthiness assurance;
  • Developing and implementing quality systems and procedures;
  • Testing procedures; and
  • Use of improved design data.
  • The experience in paragraph A or B is typically acquired in such positions as:

  • Quality engineer;
  • Quality systems supervisor/manager;
  • Quality systems auditor;
  • Service representative with technical quality experience;
  • FAA designee such as a designated manufacturing inspection representative (DMIR); or
  • Designated airworthiness representative (DAR) authorized to perform manufacturing inspection functions on behalf of the FAA.
  • Interviews and Assessments:   Applicants may be required to appear for an interview and/or other assessments to determine whether they possess the necessary competencies and personal qualities to successfully perform Aviation Safety Inspector duties.  In addition, applicants for Aviation Safety Inspector (Operations) positions will be required to demonstrate proficiency in an airplane or simulator.

    Information on obtaining Aviation Safety Inspector positions with the Federal Government is available from the Office of Personnel Management through USAJOBS, the Federal Government's official employment information system. This resource for locating and applying for job opportunities can be accessed through the Internet at http://www.usajobs.gov or through an interactive voice response telephone system at (703) 724–1850 or  (703) 724–1850  or TDD (978) 461–8404 and   (978) 461–8404. These numbers are not toll free, and charges may result. For advice on how to find and apply for Federal jobs, download the Insider's Guide to the Federal Hiring Process” online here.

    Source: OPM's Position Classification Standards for White Collar Work


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