The best Government Job Source

Range/Forestry Technicians
Significant Points

This series includes all positions that primarily require a practical knowledge of the methods and techniques of range conservation and related resource management fields. Range technicians provide practical technical support in range research efforts; in the marketing of the range resource; and in the scientific management, protection, and development of grasslands and other range resources.

Nature of the Work

The primary focus of the range technician's work in the Federal sector is to support an organization's resource management efforts from intensive, multiple-use natural resource management to such specialties as that of monitoring range land conditions, managing herds of wild horses, processing ranch transfers, supervising range use by permittees, and investigating unauthorized use. The basic objectives of programs for the intensive management, protection, and development of range lands and range resources are (1) to apply sound utilization and conservation practices to the natural resources of publicly managed lands and (2) promote such practices among all range land owners and users through example, cooperation, research and interpretation and dissemination of information.

Aerial Fire Detection Specialist, GS-0455-05

The purpose of this position is to receive specialized training and serve as an aerial fire detection specialist in detecting and monitoring wildfires within the state. Other duties may be performed while not assigned detection duties in the close proximity of the standby area.

The area supported requires the extensive use of aircraft and highly trained individuals to locate and monitor limited suppression fires. These employees are also responsible for operating infrared equipment on low level flights over fires for mapping hot spots for the information of the fire boss. The total time spent personally performing or receiving formal or on-the-job training on aerial detection duties or other fire fighting suppression assignments are estimated to comprise approximately 70% of the time. This employee routinely accompanies an experienced aerial detection specialist or the work leader on flights to learn the specialized duties of the position and to assist with in-flight activities.

DUTIES

A. Receives on-the-job training and performs aerial detection flights for the purpose of locating, sizing up, and photographing fires and for monitoring fires in limited suppression areas. Uses prior fire fighting experience and training to locate fires; sizes up situations and relays specialized information to the dispatch office regarding fire size, rate of spread, potential resource values at risk, and proximity to habitation; and provides recommendations for personnel, equipment and supplies to be dispatched to the fire or makes a recommendation that no suppression be taken at this time but that the fire be monitored for potential suppression action in case fire conditions change. As assigned, uses firefighting background to assist in providing air monitoring of fires being suppressed for the Fire Boss, providing special information on hot spots and perimeter activities, and recommending methods and procedures that may be effective based upon specific observations. Assists in observing and recommending the need for retardant drops on unmanned fires. Operates infrared equipment for special photographs as requested by the fire boss. Documents fire activity as applicable preparing the narrative for DI-1202.

B. Assists in assimilating detailed information for the Initial Attack Management System including ALDS, RAWS, and fire weather forecast information. Receives instruction in how to operate and operates computer terminals/ programs for obtaining information. Assists with dispatch functions utilizing preplanned dispatch guides.

C. During periods of low fire occurrence, may fill other fire support assignments.

Aerial Fire Detection Specialist, GS-0455-06

The purpose of this position is to serve as an aerial fire detection specialist in detecting and monitoring wildfires within the state. Other duties may be performed while not assigned detection duties in the close proximity of the standby area. The area supported requires the extensive use of aircraft and highly trained individuals to locate and monitor limited suppression fires. These employees are also responsible for operating infrared equipment on low level flights over fires for mapping hot spots for the information of the fire boss. The total time spent personally performing aerial detection duties or other fire fighting suppression assignments are estimated to be less than 50% of the time.

DUTIES

A. Assists in keeping current records on pilots' hours, flight time, and duty time. Monitors hours of flight time to next scheduled maintenance and for days off. Completes OAS-23s daily and submits information to designated personnel.

B. Determines or assists in determining the detection flights and routes to be followed from fire reports received from the public and from lightning detection and weather conditions. Coordinates detection routes and coverage areas with Zone and Station Dispatch and the Fire Coordination Center. Assimilates detailed information from the Initial Attack Management System including ALDS, RAWS, and the fire weather forecast as background for preparing plans.

C. Performs aerial detection flights for the purpose of locating, sizing up, and mapping fires and for monitoring fires in limited suppression areas. Uses prior fire fighting experience and training to locate fires; sizes up situations and relays specialized information to the dispatch office regarding fire size, rate of spread, potential resource values at risk, and proximity to habitation; and provides recommendations for personnel, equipment and supplies to be dispatched to the fire or makes a recommendation that no suppression be taken at this time but that the fire be monitored for potential suppression action in case fire conditions change. As assigned, uses firefighting background to provide air monitoring of fires being suppressed for the Fire Boss providing special information on hot spots, perimeter activities, and recommends methods and procedures that may be effective based upon specific observations. May recommend and serve as a supervisor for retardant drops on unmanned fires. Operates infrared equipment for special maps as requested by the fire boss. Documents fire activity as applicable preparing the narrative for DI-1202.

D. During periods of low fire occurrence, performs other duties as assigned.

Engine Crew Leader, GS-0455-06

This position is located in a District fire suppression organization. The employee is assigned to a medium or heavy-weight engine crew and serves, on a recurring basis, as the working crew leader for multiple engine initial attack fire suppression efforts. Crew varies from 2 to 10 people dependent upon the severity of the dispatch report. May also serve as an engine operator. The duties include participating in engine operations on the fireline and in the minor repair and maintenance of fire fighting vehicles, equipment, and tools. Other duties relating to the fire suppression program or other resource programs may be assigned during stand-by periods. Although the employee often serves as a crew leader, the lead duties are not performed on a continuous basis for three or more people.

DUTIES

A. The primary purpose of this position is to serve as an on-site engine crew leader coordinating the work of multiple fire engines and associated crews. Accompanies crews to the fire line and serves as an Initial Attack Incident Commander. Determines probable cause of fires, protects origin, and completes fire reports. Analyzes fire conditions and determines attack methods. Assigns engines/crews to specific fire fighting operations commensurate with their training and experience. Operates or directs the operation of engines and oversees the use of pumps and hoses as well as a variety of specialized tools, equipment, and techniques while actively suppressing wild fires. Directs the use of a variety of specialized tools, equipment and techniques in actively suppressing fires. Scouts and locates lines. Directs line construction, back fire and burn out, hose layout and pumping, tree falling, mobile and stationary engine attack, and holding/patrol/mop up operations.

B. Functions in the positions for which qualified during prescribed burns. May serve during fire emergencies in other SOF or Incident Command System (ICS) positions for which trained and qualified.

C. Directs the maintenance and repair of vehicle(s), equipment and tools. Assists the crew(s) in more difficult tasks. Ensures adequate supplies are available. Participates in fire readiness drills. Assists with crew training, especially in conducting on-the-job follow up to formal training, crew readiness exercises, and tail-gate safety sessions. Receives specialized training under the lCS.

D. Spends from 10-20% of the time in administrative related activities such as timekeeping, requisition of supplies, equipment use reports, etc. As assigned, serves as acting engine crew foreman or station manager.

Aerial Fire Detection Specialist, GS-0455-07

The purpose of this position is to serve as a lead in training, detecting, and monitoring wildfires in the State. Other duties may be performed while not assigned detection duties in the close proximity of the standby area. The area supported requires the extensive use of aircraft and highly trained individuals to locate and monitor limited suppression fires. These employees are also responsible for operating infrared equipment on low level flights over fires for mapping hot spots for the information of the fire boss. The total time spent personally performing aerial detection duties or other fire fighting suppression assignments is estimated to be less than 50% of the time. Although the employee is a lead for the aerial detection program, normally no more than 1 or 2 specialists are assigned to the function, and they may be assigned on an intermittent basis.

DUTIES

A. Responsible for the supervision and/or work leading of 2-3 employees assigned to the detection activities for the unit. Provides on-the-job training in detection methods and procedures and for infrared mapping, makes assignments, arranges work schedules to meet the unit's detection needs, and provides input into employee's performance ratings. Prepares and modifies plans for detection activities based upon the personnel, equipment, aircraft/pilot capabilities, and fire occurrence at the unit assigned. Completes administrative reports (personnel property, time and attendance, and equipment usage) for assigned personnel and equipment.

B. Serves as a coordinator for contractual pilots and aircraft when they are involved in detection operations at the site. Briefs pilots on detection routes and detection operations procedures as well as the type of flying conditions and routes to follow for infrared mapping. Keeps current records on pilots' hours, flight time, and duty time. Monitors hours of flight time to next scheduled maintenance and for days off. Completes OAS-23s daily and submits information to designated personnel.

C. Determines the detection flights and routes to be followed from fire reports received from the public and from lightning detection and weather conditions. Coordinates detection routes and coverage areas with Zone and Station Dispatch and the Fire Coordination Center. Assimilates detailed information from Alaska Initial Attack Management System including ALDS, RAWS, and the fire weather forecast as background for preparing plans.

D. Performs aerial detection flights for the purpose of locating, sizing up, and mapping fires and for monitoring fires in limited suppression areas. Uses prior fire fighting experience and training to locate fires; sizes up situations and relays specialized information to the dispatch office regarding fire size, rate of spread, potential resource values at risk, and proximity to native villages or homesteads; and provides recommendations for personnel, equipment and supplies to be dispatched to the fire or makes a recommendation that no suppression be taken at this time but that the fire be monitored for potential suppression action in case fire conditions change. As assigned, uses fire fighting background to provide air monitoring of fires being suppressed for the Fire Boss providing special information on hot spots, perimeter activities, and recommends methods and procedures that may be effective based upon specific observations. May recommend and serve as a supervisor for retardant drops on unmanned fires. Operates infrared equipment for special maps as requested by the fire boss. Documents fire activity as applicable preparing the narrative for DI-1202.

E. During periods of low fire occurrence, may fill fire suppression assignments at other locations.

Air Services Officer, GS-0455-07

The primary purpose of the position is to supervise routine operations at an air service location, and to provide assistance to air operations. The employee is normally assigned to a location which is a designated air base and may have a retardant operation. The position requires prior line firefighting experience and training, and the employee must be red-carded as an Air Attack Boss. It is estimated that 30-40% of the time will be spent as an Air Attack Boss or in other line firefighting positions. The position supervises three or more people on a recurring basis.

DUTIES

1. Supervisory. Supervises a group of employees performing retardant mixing; loading of retardant on aircraft; movement and parking of aircraft on ramp; loading of aircraft with fire fighting tools, equipment, and supplies; and related duties. Selects employees or participates in the selection of employees. Provides informal training, recommends employees for formal training. Determines work schedules, and makes work assignments based upon the prior training and experience of employees. Review work ensuring it meets established standards. Ensures that employees have tools, equipment and supplies available for performing the assigned duties. Establishes performance standards and evaluates performance of employees at end of season or annually, as applicable. Recommends employees for reassignment or promotion. Resolves informal grievances, Informs employees of personnel, fiscal, property, and purchasing guidelines and procedures affecting themselves and/or their work. Approves leave for short periods of time. Ensures that employees are red-carded to perform the duties assigned during fire suppression operations.

Supervises retardant personnel in site development, site establishment, loading and unloading of retardant aircraft. Explains quality product control of retardants and ensures control standards are maintained.

Supervises the use of ramp area, ensures that safety precautions are observed on the ramp, ensures ramp is kept orderly.

Supervises contract pilots and aircraft assigned to the unit ensuring that safe and efficient aviation operations are followed. Reviews, corrects, and submits aircraft usage reports.

If applicable, supervises contract fuel personnel or employees involved in refueling aircraft.

2. Air Services Specialist. May serve as project inspector for aircraft assigned to the unit. Keeps current records on pilot hours, duty time, and flight time for adherence to Agency and FAA regulations. Monitors aircraft hours of flight time to next scheduled maintenance and days off for adherence to FAA maintenance regulations. Ensures aircraft and pilots have the required OAS certifications. Completes administrative paperwork is completely accurately and is submitted as required. Ensures that all safety equipment, first aid gear, fire extinguishers, and extrication equipment is operational and readily accessible if needed. Ensures that aircraft usage, ramp, and aviation safety standards are observed. Recommends changes to contracts and other internal guidelines and procedures.

3. Performs one or more of the following duties:

Air Attack Boss. Serves as Air Attack Boss as assigned on large fires. Circles fire analyzing fire condition, rate of spread, type of fire fighting tactics being used, and determining the best location for slurry drops. Ensures drop locations will not endanger firefighters or fire fighting equipment, or notifies Incident Commander of conflict and delays drops until area is cleared. Communicates with lead plane pilot regarding flight pattern and drop location. In multiple aircraft flight areas, assigns flight pattern and altitude of various aircraft to ensure collisions do not occur.

As requested while in the vicinity of wildfires, provides assistance to the Incident Commander regarding fire characteristics which can be seen from a more advantageous site over the fire. May provide recommendations regarding fire fighting tactics, methods and procedure to be used in controlling wildfires, and establishing fire lines, based upon prior line fire fighting experience and training.

Helitack Operations. Assists with helicopter operations when helitack crews are assigned to the unit. Ensures aircraft/pilot has OAS certifications. Ensures safety precautions are used in loading helicopter, performing hoover hookups, attaching sling loads, and using buckets. Assists with determining load calculations. Maintains pilot/helicopter records while the aircraft is assigned to the unit. Assists in training helitack crews in helitack procedures and safety procedures when working around helicopters and other aircraft.

Aerial Detection. Performs aerial detection flights for the purpose of locating, sizing up, and mapping fires and for monitoring fires in limited suppression areas. Uses prior fire fighting experience and training to locate fires; sizes up situations and relays specialized information to the dispatch office regarding fire size, rate of spread, potential resource values at risk, and proximity to developed property; and provides recommendations for personnel, equipment and supplies to be dispatched to the fire or makes a recommendation that no suppression action be taken at this time but that the fire be monitored for potential suppression action in case fire conditions change. As assigned, uses firefighting background to provide air monitoring of fires being suppressed for the Incident Commander providing special information on hot spots, perimeter activities, recommends methods and procedures that may be effective based upon specific observations, etc. May recommend and serve as a supervisor for retardant drops on unmanned fires. Operates infrared equipment for special maps as requested by the Incident Commander. Documents fire activity as applicable.

4. Performs other red-carded fire line duties as assigned.

Air Attack Boss, GS-0455-08

The primary purpose of the position is to serve as an Air Attack Boss directing Air Tankers dropping retardants on fires. Position requires knowledge of initial attack suppression tactics air traffic control procedures over fires, air tanker capabilities and project fie strategy sufficient to determine number and location of retardant drops and evaluate effectiveness.

DUTIES

1. Pre-season 25%

  • Assists in evaluation of new aircraft and in identifying air tanker equipment for contracts.
  • Trains fire personnel in the use of retardants stressing cost effectiveness, potential hazards, and interaction with different rules.
  • Assists in training and certifying additional Air Attack Bosses meeting Agency and USFS National Standards.
  • Assists in tactical training of Air Attack and other air operations pilots in tactical use of aircraft, safety procedures, and product utilizations.

    2. Fire Suppression 55%

    During the fire suppression period, is assigned to a heavy suppression unit to work with assigned Pilots and aircraft. Remains in stand-by status with the pilot ready for immediate dispatch with aircraft. Serves as a primary Air Attack Boss for the location. On manned fires, is responsible for controlling number and types of aircraft in fire airspace. Determines flight patterns and number and location of retardant drops and evaluates effectiveness in relaying flight and drop information to retardant plans.

    Serves as an Incident Commander responsible for developing and implementing strategy and tactics on unmanned fires utilizing Air Tankers. Ensures the efficient utilization, coordination, and safety of the Air Tanker Operation for the location during flight and standby periods. Enforces appropriate Agency, OAS, and FAA regulations as they pertain to the Air Tanker Fleet. Regulations include aircraft capabilities, limitations, duty and flight hour limitation, and invoking airspace restrictions over fires.

    Serves as a primary on-site Aviation Safety Officer for the Air Tanker Operation performing duties while carrying out Air Attack assignments.

    Serves as an on-site Initial Attack coordinator for aircraft during multiple fire occurrence.

    Serves as a member of an overhead fire management team as an Air Attack Boss.

    May be assigned to fires throughout the Cont1nental U.S., Alaska, ana Canada.

    3. Post-season 20%

    Assists in preparing reports, makes technical evaluations of air attack operations, and recommends changes in policy, contract specifications, and other areas for ensuing year.

    Air Tactical Supervisor, GS-0455-09

    The primary purpose of this position is to serve as an Air Tactical Supervisor assigned to the state's Aerial Supervision Module (ASM1) (70%). A secondary purpose of the position is to provide Air Tactical Program Management (10%), Liaison to external and internal cooperators (10%) and Training (10%).

    The ASMI is a fixed wing platform that utilizes two crew members to perform the functions of traditional air attack and when necessary performs low-level operations including lead profiles. ASMI aircraft and crews are national resources. The ASMI requires both crew members to be trained and work as a team, utilizing Crew Resource Management (CRM) skills and techniques to enhance safety, efficiency and effectiveness. Module operations require a fluid relationship between crew members that incorporates task sharing and coordination.

    The incumbent serves as a Supervisor/Manager of Bureau and interagency aerial operations over incidents; this includes directing and coordinating tactical, logistical and other fixed and/or rotor wing aircraft such as air tankers, lead planes, large helicopters, smoke jumper aircraft, helitack aircraft, law enforcement, press, and civil aircraft with ground based personnel and management.

    Position provides for overall efficiency, effectiveness and safety of aerial and ground incident personnel or resources while airborne over an incident. OPM has determined that prior wild land fire fighting experience and training is required to carry out the duties and responsibilities of this position.

    Major Duties

    Aerial Operations

    1. Aerial Supervision (50%)

    Serves as a team member of an ASMI with a Federal or cooperating state government Air Tactical Pilot. As mission commander provides oversight, supervision, direction to and is responsible for all aerial resources assigned to incidents when they are in flight. Works in a team concept with the Air Tactical Pilot and applies Crew Resource Management Principles to all aerial assignments. Responds in aircraft as an ASMI to wild land fires and other emergencies. During incidents provides leadership and promotes teamwork with the Air Tactical Pilot, fire managers, and ground based personnel regarding incident tactical aircraft operations, performance and safety.

    Responsible for implementation of the air/ground team concept over incidents. Serves as airborne Incident Commander until qualified ground personnel assume responsibility. Develops strategies, applies tactics and makes recommendations in support of management incident objectives. Coordinates strategy and tactics with unit fire managers or Incident Commanders. Determines and recommends resource needs while ever incidents. Develops and coordinates recommendations for air-to-air and air-to-ground communication plans. Maintains communication with ground forces, assigned aircraft, and dispatching organizations. Recommends and defines boundaries of Temporary Flight Restriction as needed.

    Evaluates fuel types, terrain, fire weather, current and expected fire behavior for effective aerial size up, suppression, and coordination with ground or management personnel.

    Coordinates with unit fire managers identifying priorities, values at risk, ground and aerial restrictions on incident assignments.

    Provides risk assessment and mitigates unacceptable safety risks for aerial and ground personnel.

    2. Tactical Aviation Planning (10%)

    Responsible for providing input to fire and aviation management specialists at the incident, field, state, and national office level for current and future cost effective performance, utilization, mobilization and demobilization of aerial resources.

    Coordinates with the incident, air attack bases, state and field office fire and aviation managers for scheduling, briefings, and debriefings of assigned flight crews. Assures flight crews receive management objectives or Incident Action Plans prier to implementing operations.

    3. Fire Suppression (10%)

    Provides leadership in ground fire suppression assignments as Type 3 Incident Commander, Division/Group Supervisor and other wild land fire positions as needed.

    Maintains wild land fire currency and qualifications in these operational areas.

    Aviation Program Management

    1. Air Tactical Program Management (10%)

    Provides assistance to. Fire and Aviation Managers with their responsibility for all facets of aerial suppression operations. Serves as the Bureau's geographic area (i.e., Alaska for Alaska, Nevada for Western Great Basin, Utah/Idaho. for Eastern Great Basin, California for the Southwest region) representative on the nationally chartered Interagency Air Tactical Group Steering Committee. This group is chartered by the Aviation Management Council (AMC). Participants are USFS, BLM, BIA, and NPS.

    2. Liaison (10%)

    Functions as a Bureau expert on aviation wild land fire suppression techniques. In this capacity, coordinates operations with various Federal or state land management agency policies during complex wild land fires and other incidents. Provides clarification and explanation of policy, priorities, and regulations to air and ground personnel. Assists in resolving conflicting operational and policy requirements. Recommends policy and operational procedure changes to national level decision makers.

    3. Training (10%)

    Conducts training/instruction, both in the classroom and on-the-job, in accordance with the Air Tactical Pilots' training plan. Typical training includes subjects such as Incident Command System (ICS), Fire Suppression and Tactics, and Basic Air Operations related to wild land fire. Students are trainee Air Tactical Pilots, Air Tactical Supervisors, Air Tactical Group Supervisors, Incident Commanders, Fire Fighters, Helicopter personnel, and Dispatchers.

    Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

    Specialized Experience (for positions at GS-4 and above):

    In addition to the experience requirements described in the group coverage standard, seasonal experience may also be creditable. A season of experience is considered to be a period of no less than 3 months of continuous employment on a seasonal basis. Shorter periods may be combined to make a season, provided a total of at least 3 months' experience is shown. For any period where the work exceeded 3 months, the excess work is credited towards an additional season of experience. One season of experience is qualifying for GS-2; 2 seasons of experience qualify for GS-3; and 4 seasons of experience qualify for GS-4. Examples of qualifying specialized experience include:

    • Work in the conservation, regulation, and use of public or Federally controlled lands for grazing.
    • Range research activities.
    • Work in the operation of a livestock ranch or in assisting in the management or preservation of lands comparable to the public range.
    • Range or forest fire control, prevention, or suppression work.

    OR

    Education and Training:

    Grade Level Education and Training
    For GS-3: Successful completion of 1 year of study that included at least 6 semester hours in a combination of courses such as range management or conservation, agriculture, forestry, wildlife management, engineering, biology, mathematics, or other natural or physical sciences.
    For GS-4: Successful completion of 2 years of study that included at least 12 semester hours in any combination of courses such as forestry, agriculture, crop or plant science, range management or conservation, wildlife management, watershed management, soil science, natural resources (except marine fisheries and oceanography), outdoor recreation management, civil or forest engineering, or wildland fire science. No more than 3 semester hours in mathematics is credit-able.
    For GS-5: Successful completion of a full 4-year course of study leading to a bachelor's degree (a) with major study in forestry, range management, agriculture, or a subject-matter field directly related to the position, or (b) that included at least 24 semester hours in any combination of courses such as those shown above For GS-4. No more than 6 semester hours in mathematics is creditable.
    Sources of Additional Information

    Information on obtaining Range Technician Series positions with the Federal Government is available from the Office of Personnel Management through USAJOBS, the Federal Government's official employment information system. This resource for locating and applying for job opportunities can be accessed through the Internet at http://www.usajobs.gov or through an interactive voice response telephone system at (703) 724–1850 or  (703) 724–1850  or TDD (978) 461–8404 and   (978) 461–8404. These numbers are not toll free, and charges may result. For advice on how to find and apply for Federal jobs, download the Insider's Guide to the Federal Hiring Process” online here.

    Sources:

    • Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition; and
    • Office of Personnel Management, Position Classification Standards.

    Download Today!

    Do Your Homework

    The competition is fierce when it comes to finding a government job today, but the best informed job seekers are sure to come out on top. Insider's Guide to the Federal Hiring Process, shows you step-by-step what you need to do in order to be considered for government employment.

    Contact

    We are here to help you and answer your questions. support@dreamfedjob.com